Resources

Forklift training reduces product damage

Forklift training reduces product damage

Less product damage is an added benefit to professional forklift operator training.   Operators need to be able to accurately judge: fork height, fork length,  and tilt angle to avoid damaging loads.  Broken pallets can further complicate safe handling. All subjects covered in our on-site forklift training.  

Aerial Lift safety training

Forklift, boom lift or scissor lift use in a public area means the operator must ensure safety for pedestrians.   Not like this! Cones, cordons or flag persons help to keep people out of the working area.  In Martin’s Forklift corporate training programs we always cover this topic.

Forklift safety and speed

The safe speed for a forklift is one that will allow a controlled stop at all times.  A controlled stop is one that involves hitting nothing and not losing the load. What this means is that operators need to take into account the load, the ground conditions, the forklift’s tires and brake condition as well […]

Scissor lift safety

A scissor lift operator in the US was fatally injured last month when driving through a doorway and trapping his head between the railing and the door frame. The most common accidents with scissor lifts include crushing injuries, electrocution, tip overs, and falls. WorkSafeBC has some useful tips on using a scissor lift – also known […]

Forklifts and pedestrian safety

Thousands of pedestrians are injured by forklifts every year.  Ideally pedestrians and forklifts should not be sharing the same space, but in the real working world it is not always possible to separate them.  So what can an employer do?   Train the forklift operators and educate the pedestrians.  Although pedestrians have the right of […]

Thank you to all our customers!

Thank you to all the forklift and aerial lift operators we have trained in 2017 – from Campbell River to Parksville, Vancouver, Sechelt and beyond.  Wishing you happy and safe holidays from Martin’s Forklift Training.  Remember drive it slow, keep it low and look behind before you go and always be a “smooth operator”.